FANDOM


Index Edit

  1. Article I – Fundamental Declarations on the Polynesian Empire
  2. Article II – Rights of Every Human Being in Polynesia
  3. Article III – The Polynesian Citizenship
  4. Article IV – The Structure of Polynesia
  5. Article V – Amending the Federal Law
  6. Article VI – Amending the Constitution
  7. Article VII – Elections and the Formation of a Federal and State government
  8. Article VIII – Supreme Court Trials
  9. Article IX – National Symbols and Language
  10. Article X – Rights to Fair Trials
  11. Article XIImpeachment and Recall
  12. Article XIIThe Power of States
  13. Article XIIIWartime Powers

Content Edit

The Constitution has 12 articles; each divided in sections, then divided in sub sections and sub-subsections.

Article I Edit

Article 1 – Fundamental declarations on the Polynesian Empire

  1. Polynesia is a sovereign, independent, unitary, and indivisible National Empire.
  2. Polynesia is a democratic, meritocratic empire, governed by the rule of law, in which human dignity, the citizens' rights and freedoms, the free development of human personality, justice and political pluralism represent supreme values, in the spirit of the democratic traditions of the Polynesian people and shall be guaranteed.
  3. Polynesia shall be organized based on the principle of the separation and balance of powers - Branch of Legislation, Branch of Ministries, Branch of Policies, and Branch of Judgment - within the framework of constitutional democracy. Therefore no person is entitled to combine a top function in two, three, or four branches of government; thus, the Head of Legislation, the Head of Ministries, Head of Policy, and the Head Judge shall be no less than four different persons.
  4. In Polynesia, the observance of the Constitution, its supremacy and the laws shall be mandatory.
  5. The national sovereignty shall reside within the Polynesian people, that shall exercise it by means of their representative bodies, resulting from free, periodical and fair elections, as well as by referendum.
  6. No group or person may exercise sovereignty in one's own name.
  7. Polynesia is a Democratic, Meritocratic Republic, ruled by no one individual.

Article II Edit

Article 2 – Rights of every human being in Polynesia

  1. Every human has the right:
    1. Of freedom of thought, meaning, and religion.
    2. Of equality, by race, religion, political opinion, language, natural sex, property, birth, and 
    3. Of privacy.
    4. Of common human interaction.
    5. Of freedom speach.
      1. This does not include threats.
    6. To life.
      1. To protect one's own life or other lives.
    7. To pursue happiness.
    8. To have personal or common property.
      1. To secure and protect such property.
    9. When accused of a contravention of law, to be arrested in a fair and speedy trial and to be treated correctly.
      1. All people are legally allowed to have a lawyer.
      2. If one does not a have a lawyer or cannot afford a lawyer, a government lawyer will be assigned.
    10. To protest in a civilized non-violent manner.
      1. This does not include death threats, vandalization, or non-violent assaults.
    11. To bear military grade arms and have an organized militia.
      1. One must be 24 to purchase a gun.
    12. To refuse the quartering of soldiers.
    13. To relax and recreate.
    14. To live in peace with their fellow-men.
    15. To live in welfare.
    16. To remain silent.
    17. To express their views, as long as this doesn't conflict with other laws.
    18. To form a marriage
      1. A marriage is a union between one human being, no more, no less, who is naturally male, and one human being, no more, no less, who is naturally female.
        1. Hermaphrodites are not considered male or female.
    19. To become a Polynesian citizen.
      1. One must be 24 to become a citizen.
  2. Every Polynesian citizen has the right:
    1. To have (a) residenc(y/ies).
    2. To work and to receive education.
    3. To participate in federal and state politics and to be a candidate in any Polynesian election, unless they do not meet the requirements.
      1. See Article 7 for requirements.

Article III Edit

Article 3 – The Polynesian citizenship

  1. Every inhabitant of Polynesia has the right to become a Polynesian citizen.
    1. An inhabitant of Polynesia is every person who has a domicile (permanent residence) within Polynesia.
    2. There are requirements to become a Polynesian citizen:
      1. They must reside in Polynesia.
      2. They must be 24 years of age.
      3. They must have made at least 50 edits.
        1. Acts of vandalism or related edits are not to be included in this count.
      4. They must truthfully provide the following personal information:
        1. Their official name that consists of at least one given name and a surname.
        2. Their biological sex.
        3. Their domicile (permanent residence); this being a full address of a residence in a Polynesian town, which is a city or village.
        4. Their nation and date of birth.
  2. The rights of a citizen are described in Article 2.
  3. One's citizenship may be taken away as a punishment in a trial.

Article IV Edit

Article 4 – The structure of Polynesia

  1. The Kingdom of Polynesia is governed on different levels:
    1. All members of the government must be citizens of Polynesia. (see Article 2.2.3)
    2. The federal level encompasses the entire Polynesian territory.
      1. All powers of legislation inhere to the Branch of Legislation. This body may, as the sole body in the nation, amend legal matters in the Federal Law and the Constitution.
        1. The Head of Legislation is the ceremonial head of the government; however, they do not have power over other branches.
      2. All powers of ministries inhere to the Branch of Ministries. This body creates and runs ministries and government programs.
      3. All powers of policies inhere to the Branch of Policies.  This body creates bills to be passed by the Branch of Legislation and manages social, economic, and environmental policies.
      4. All powers of judgment inhere to the Branch of Judgment. This body enforces laws, interprets laws, and runs the courts.
    3. The state level consists of 3 states with limited powers: (name 1), (name 2), and (name 3).
      1. The state governments must adhere to the Constitution, its amendments, and the Federal Law.
      2. The local level, consisting of cities and towns is governed by state authorities.
      3. The state level governments each have the same government system as the federal government.
        1. All members of the government must reside in the state in which they are governing.
  2. Therefore there will be no more than a specific number of officials in the government.
    1. All government workers or officials are members of the government. This includes all workers in government programs and government lawyers.
    2. An official is someone who is elected into office through Federal or State Elections as stated in Article 7.
  3. The total number of officials of the federal government will sum up to no more than 130 officials.
  4. Each state will also have a government of no more than 130 officials.
  5. Therefore, in total there will never be more than 520 officials.

Article V Edit

Article 5 – Amending the Federal Law

  1. A motion to amend the Federal Law can be:
    • A proposal for a new article in the Federal Law;
    • A proposal to amend a section of the Federal Law;
    • A proposal to remove a section of the Federal Law.
  2. The required steps to propose a motion to the Federal Law in the Branch of Legislation:
    1. All Polynesian citizens may write and propose motions to the Federal Law.
    2. Motions are presented to the Branch of Legislation.
    3. All proposed bills for Federal law must accord to the rest of the Constitution. This will be determined by a vote.
      1. The Branch of Legislation must pass the bill as Constitutional by a super-majority.
      2. The Head of Legislation, the Head of Ministries, Head of Policy, and the Head Judge must all approve the bill as constitutional.
    4. All officials of the Branch of Legislation are expected to read the motion and form a personal opinion about it. In order to obtain the support of a super-majority of Branch of Legislation, changes may be proposed.
    5. All officials of the Branch of Legislation are expected to vote on the motion.
      1. There are three valid voting options: pro (in favor of the motion), contra (in opposition to the motion) and abstention (the wish not to vote).
      2. A super-majority is required to pass a motion. A super-majority is described as more than 2/3 of the valid votes.
      3. All officials of the Branch of Legislation have two weeks’ time to cast their vote in the Second Chamber. Voting may be closed earlier if the required super-majority is reached. The proposer may also choose to lengthen the voting period.
      4. If one does not vote, they will be notified to vote and receive a one week extension. If they still do not vote then they will be punished by the Branch of Judgment.
        1. Punishment will be determined by the Branch of Judgment.
    6. When the motion is accepted by the Branch of Legislation, it must be implemented. The Head of Legislation, the Head of Ministries, Head of Policy, and the Head Judge are privileged to enshrine passed motions in the law.
    7. When the motion is not accepted, either because the super-majority opposed it or because no super-majority was found in favor of the motion, it shall be discarded. Any citizen may propose a new version to be voted upon.
  3. A motion that is not intended to be enshrined in the Federal Law, but that does need approval from the Branch or Legislation, is proposed and voted in the same way.
  4. For each motion that has been proposed to the Branch of Legislation, and that is in due time either approved, rejected or proven unable to gain the required support, the Branch of Legislation must keep a record, which will be known as the Congressional Journal.

Article VI Edit

Article 6 – Amending the Constitution

  1. A motion to amend the Constitution is called an Amendment.
  2. All Amendments must accord to the rest of the Constitution. This will be determined by a vote.
    1. The Branch of Legislation must pass the bill as Constitutional by a super-majority.
    2. The Head of Legislation, the Head of Ministries, Head of Policy, and the Head Judge must all approve the bill as constitutional.
  3. The required steps to propose a motion to the Constitution in Branch of Legislation:
    1. The Branch of Policies and the Branch of Ministries may write and propose amendments to the Constitution.
    2. Amendments are presented to the Branch of Legislation.
    3. All officials of the Branch of Legislation are expected to vote on the amendment in the Second Chamber.
      1. There are three valid voting options: pro (in favor of the motion), contra (in opposition to the motion), and abstention (the wish not to vote).
      2. All officials of the Branch of Legislation have two weeks’ time to cast their vote in the Second Chamber. Voting may be closed earlier if the required super-majority is reached. The proposer may also choose to lengthen the voting period.
    4. When the amendment is accepted by the Branch of Legislation, it must be implemented. The Head of Legislation, the Head of Ministries, Head of Policy, and the Head Judge are privileged to enshrine passed amendments in the law, although all officials of the Branch of Legislation may do it, if done correctly.
    5. When the amendment is not accepted, either because the super-majority opposed it or because no super-majority was found in favor of the amendment, it shall be discarded. Any member of the Branch of Policies and the Branch of Ministries may propose a new version to be voted upon.

Article VII Edit

Article 7 – Elections and the formation of a federal and state government

  1. Federal and State Elections:
    1. Every year Federal and State elections must be held for the election of the government.
    2. The term of office of every member of the four branches of government is exactly one year. Therefore every year the elections should be held at the same date.
    3. Election procedure during Federal and State Elections for the Branch of Legislation:
      1. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian> citizen who has a Professional's Degree or Doctorate Degree can become a candidate in the Federal and State Elections. This period begins on the 1st of January.
        1. The candidate must nominate themselves.
      2. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma or a Certificate of High School Equivalency can cast their votes in favor of candidates in the Federal and State elections.
        1. Every citizen that meets the requirements may cast three favorable votes in both the Federal and State Elections for the Branch of Legislation: a Major Vote, a Minor Vote and a Favor Vote. A Major Vote is worth three points, a Minor Vote two and a Favor Vote one.
        2. Citizens may choose not to cast their votes, or to only cast some of them.
        3. Citizens may not cast multiple votes for the same candidate. All cast votes must be given to different candidates.
      3. The normal dates of elections, excluding the possibility of dissolution of the Branch of Legislation, are set at January 1st to 10th for nominations, and from January 11th to 21st for voting. Inauguration Day is set at February 1st.
      4. Candidates are allowed to withdraw from the election if they wish.
      5. All candidates will complete the elections with a percentage of the total votes, with the exception of those that have withdrawn.
        1. The percentage of votes cast to a certain candidate from the total votes cast is the amount of seats in Legislation that the candidate will control.
          1. The Candidate that receives the most votes is the Head of Legislation.
          2. This means that a candidate may receive fractions of a seat; however, one must receive 3 votes in order to be in the Branch of Legislation.
    4. Election procedure during Federal and State Elections for the Branch of Ministries:
      1. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a Professional's Degree or Doctorate Degree can become a candidate in the Federal and State Elections. This period begins on the 2nd of February.
        1. The candidate must nominate themselves.
      2. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma or a Certificate of High School Equivalency can cast their votes in favor of candidates in the Federal and State elections.
        1. Every citizen that meets the requirements may cast one vote in both the Federal and State Elections
        2. Citizens may choose not to cast their votes, or to only cast some of them.
        3. Citizens may not cast multiple votes for the same candidate. All cast votes must be given to different candidates.
      3. The normal dates of elections, excluding the possibility of dissolution of the Branch of Ministries, are set at January 1st to 10th for nominations, and from February 11th to 21st for voting. Inauguration Day is set at March 1st.
      4. Candidates are allowed to withdraw from the election if they wish.
      5. The 10 Candidates with the most votes become the 10 officials of the Branch of Ministries.
        1. The Candidate that receives the most votes is the Head of Ministries.
    5. Election procedure during Federal and State Elections for the Branch of Policies:
      1. During a period of three weeks, any citizen who has a Professional's Degree or Doctorate Degree can become a candidate in the Federal and State Elections. This period begins on the 2nd of March.
        1. The candidate must nominate themselves.
      2. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma or a Certificate of High School Equivalency can cast their votes in favor of candidates in the Federal and State elections.
        1. Every citizen that meets the requirements may cast one vote in both the Federal and State Elections
        2. Citizens may choose not to cast their votes, or to only cast some of them.
        3. Citizens may not cast multiple votes for the same candidate. All cast votes must be given to different candidates.
      3. The normal dates of elections, excluding the possibility of dissolution of the Branch of Policies, are set at January 2nd to 10th for nominations, and from March 11th to 21st for voting. Inauguration Day is set at April 1st.
      4. Candidates are allowed to withdraw from the election if they wish.
      5. The 10 Candidates with the most votes become the 10 officials of the Branch of Policies.
        1. The Candidate that receives the most votes is the Head of Policies.
    6. Election procedure during Federal and State Elections for the Branch of Judgment:
      1. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a Professional's Degree or Doctorate Degree can become a candidate in the Federal and State Elections. This period begins on the 2nd of April.
        1. The candidate must nominate themselves.
      2. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma or a Certificate of High School Equivalency can cast their votes in favor of candidates in the Federal and State elections.
        1. Every citizen that meets the requirements may cast one vote in both the Federal and State Elections
        2. Citizens may choose not to cast their votes, or to only cast some of them.
        3. Citizens may not cast multiple votes for the same candidate. All cast votes must be given to different candidates.
      3. The normal dates of elections, excluding the possibility of dissolution of the Branch of Judgment, are set at April 2nd to 10th for nominations, and from April 11th to 21st for voting. Inauguration Day is set at May 1st.
      4. Candidates are allowed to withdraw from the election if they wish.
      5. The 10 Candidates with the most votes become the 10 officials of the Branch of Judgment.
        1. The Candidate that receives the most votes is the Head of Judgment.
    7. In the case of a tie in any election in Polynesia, voting will be extended for one week for the branch in which there is a tie.
      1. If there is still a tie after the week, if one of the tied candidates is an incumbent candidate in the position, then the incumbent candidate wins the election.
        1. If neither or both of the candidates are incumbents, then the current head of the branch in which there is a tie will decide who wins the election.

Article VIII Edit

Article 8 – Supreme Court Trials

  1. The Supreme Court is part of the Branch of Judgments roles. It consists of all 10 officials of the Branch of Judgment
  2. A lawsuit is a civil or public action brought before a court of law in which a plaintiff, a party who claims to have received damages from a defendant's actions, seeks a legal or equitable remedy, from the defendant who is required to respond to the plaintiff's complaint.
  3. A lawsuit can be opened by a plaintiff or a public plaintiff.
    1. Any person in Polynesia may be a plaintiff in a lawsuit.
    2. A public plaintiff is a representative of the federal government or any institution of it or any other level of administration in Polynesia.
      1. The federal attorney is the public plaintiff representing the federal government, the entire population or any other administrative institution of the federal level in court. He or she is appointed by the Minister of Justice.
  4. A defendant is the party accused by the plaintiff.
    1. A public defendant has the same status as a public plaintiff.
  5. The Judges, plaintiff and defendant must all be different people. If one of Judges are involved in the case, he/she must resign and a replacement be nominated.
  6. Both parties may opt to be represented in court by a lawyer.
  7. Every lawsuit before the Supreme Court must proceed in this manner and order:
    1. The plaintiff opens the lawsuit.
      1. The plaintiff makes an accusation and names the defendant in the lawsuit.
      2. The plaintiff may make a demand. This can be a period of imprisonment, a fine or/and any other punishment not contradicting the laws of Polynesia.
    2. The Supreme Court Judges must investigate the accusation. They may find the accusation not suited for Supreme Court; that is, when the accusations made are in no way a violation of the law.
    3. The Supreme Court must notify the defendant that he or she is accused in court.
    4. The Supreme Court Judges must read out the case, including accusations and demands.
    5. The plaintiff's party must speak before court in order to convince the Supreme Court Judges of the truthfulness of the made claims. He or she may bring forward witnesses that can be asked questions directly relating to the accusations, and/or evidence material. He or she may ask the defendant's party questions directly relating to the accusations.
    6. The defendant's party may speak before court. The defendant or their lawyer may plead guilty to the accusations, or not guilty. He or she may also try to convince the Supreme Court Judges of extenuating circumstances. The defendant is free to bring forward witnesses and evidence, both directly relating to the accusations or to the extenuating circumstances.
    7. The Supreme Court Judges must consider both pleas thoroughly and by interpreting the laws of Polynesia.
    8. The plaintiff's party may demand a second round, for which the same rules account.
    9. The defendant's party may demand a second round, for which the same rules account, but only if the plaintiff's party has made use of their second round.
    10. The Supreme Court Judges must consider the entirety of the lawsuit. The Judges must, within two weeks' time since the last plea, come to a conclusion. They may conclude:
      1. That the defendant is guilty of the accusations, or of a part of the accusations;
      2. That the defendant is not guilty of any accusations.
    11. All Judges must agree on the conclusion, except in the following circumstances:
      1. One of the Judges does not make an edit for a full week. In this situation, the agreement of the two remaining Judges will suffice.
      2. The Judges disagree completely over the verdict to give. In this case, the Judges must announce their inability to judge the case and stand down. A vote by the judges will be taken. If the vote is even (1/2 is in favor of the defendant being guilty, and the other 1/2 is in favor the the defendant not being guilty), then the Head of Judgment will determine the ruling.
    12. If the Supreme Court Judges find the defendant guilty, he or she may choose to sentence the defendant, by means of:
      1. A period of imprisonment in a federal penitentiary;
      2. A fine;
      3. Any other sentence, including penal labor or contributions to Polynesian society;
      4. A quick, painless, and civil death.
    13. All sentences issued by the Supreme Court:
      1. Must be in agreement with the laws of Polynesia;
      2. Must be in proportion to the violation;
      3. Must respect the personal integrity of the individual; therefore corporal punishment and inhumane forms of humiliation are prohibited.

Article IX Edit

Article 9 – National symbols and language

  1. The federal capital of Polynesia is Polynesia, (name 1)
  2. The national symbol of Polynesia (insert here)
  3. The national colors of Polynesia are (insert here)
  4. The national language is English.
    1. The variety of English spoken and written by the Polynesians is Polynesian English. Polynesian English is defined as a variety of American English, sharing its orthography and grammar, and most of its pronunciation and vocabulary, supplemented with lexical and grammatical features that are generally recognized as Polynesian and that are understandable to all Polynesians.
    2. The Polynesian authorities of all levels shall make use of standardized Polynesian English in all official documents.

Article X Edit

Article 10 – Rights to a Fair Trial

  1. All people accused in a civil or criminal case pending with a Polynesian court are entitled to a due process of law as defined in this section of the Constitution, in correspondence with Articles 1 and 2.
  2. The due process of law is supervised by the Branch of Judgment
    1. The Branch of Judgment must judge on the challenging of judges and motivations as described in Article 3 and 4 of this section of the Constitution.
  3. To ensure a due process of law a defendant in a civil or criminal case pending with a Polynesian court has the following rights:
    1. To have access to an independent and impartial judge with the full judicial power to judge on both the facts and the rights.
      1. A judge is considered independent if he or she does not follow instructions of another judge or a political actor.
      2. A judge is considered impartial if he or she does not show any bias towards a party in a case he or she is judging.
      3. The fair access to a judge is guaranteed by allowing any involved party to challenge the judge before the Branch of Legislation.
        1. If the Judicial Council agrees to the challenge it can either appoint a replacing judge or judge the case itself.
        2. If the Branch of Legislation denounces the challenge, the judge resumes his duty and his judgment is legally binding.
    2. To be provided the following means in order to be sufficiently able to exercise one's right to a fair defense:
      1. The ability to get advice from and to be defended by a lawyer which cannot be treated as a witness.
      2. A treatment in compliance with the presumption of innocence for the duration of the trial.
      3. The ability to contradict all elements of a case during the trial and to be given the proper time to do so.
        1. The right to contradiction is limited to the substantial case and does not apply to police research.
        2. The judge can make an exception to this right to protect an anonymous witness from harm.
    3. To be judged and hear one's verdict in publicity, ensured by entrance to the court room free to the public.
      1. The judge can cancel this right to protect an involved party from harm or to ensure public order.
      2. If the judge cancels this right he or she has to inform the involved parties at the start of the trial.
  4. To ensure a due process of law the parties in a civil or criminal case pending with a Polynesian court have the following rights:
    1. To receive sufficient factual and judicial motivation for the verdict given in which all means raised are to be answered.
      1. If the motivation is believed to be insufficient, dubious or contradictory any involved party may challenge the verdict before the Branch of Judgment
      2. The Branch of Judgment can suspend a verdict if the motivation is found to be insufficient, dubious or contradictory though it cannot be cancelled.
      3. A suspended verdict becomes executable when the judge altered its motivation to solve the problems determined by Branch of Judgment.
    2. To be provided with a judgment within a reasonable amount of time, at most one month after the judge opened the case.
      1. No one can be sentenced for an act more than one year after the act took place, tough the question of guilt can still be the object of a trial.
      2. An an exception, the following crimes are always punishable: murder, genocide, slavery, severe deprivation of freedom in conflict with the law, torture, grave sexual violence such as rape or forced prostitution, targeted persecution or discrimination of an identifiable group or community and forced disappearance.
    3. To see the verdict executed once it is final as a means of assuring the rule of law.

Article XI Edit

Article 11 – Impeachment and Recall

  1. Any elected government official can be impeached by the following procedure:
    1. A Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma of a Certificate of High School Equivalency must accuse the official of a valid crime with valid evidence.
      1. The validity of the evidence and the crime will be determined by the Branch of Judgement by holding a vote.
        1. The vote must be won by a super-majority to be accepted.
      2. If the vote is not accepted, then the case is dismissed.
      3. If the vote is accepted, then a court case will be held. (see Article 10)
    2. The Branch of Judgement will determine if the crime is worthy of impeaching the official by holding a vote.
      1. The vote must be won by a super-majority to be accepted.
    3. If the vote is not accepted, then the case is dismissed.
    4. If the vote is accepted, then the tried official is removed from office after the election of a new candidate for the position is finished
      1. An election for a new candidate will be held to replace the previously impeached official.
        1. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a Professional's Degree or Doctorate Degree can become a candidate in the Federal and State Elections. This period begins on the 1st of January.
          1. The candidate must nominate themselves.
        2. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma or a Certificate of High School Equivalency can cast their vote in favor of a candidate to replace the previous official.
          1. ​Only one vote may be cast by each citizen.
        3. ​The candidate who receives the most votes replaces the previous official's position.
          1. ​The newly elected candidate takes office one week after elections are finished.
            1. ​​See Article 7.1.7 for the case of a tie.
  2. Any elected government official can be recalled by the following procedure:
    1. A Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma of a Certificate of High School Equivalency must call for a recall.
      1. ​Recalls cannot be called upon until one month after the election of the candidate.
    2. ​In the case of a recall, during a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma or a Certificate of High School Equivalency can cast their vote in favor of candidates in the Federal and State elections.
      1. ​Only one vote may be cast by each citizen.
    3. ​If the same number or greater of citizens vote for the official who is being recalled, then the official retains office.
    4. If a fewer number of citizens vote for the official who is being recalled, then the official is removed from office.
      1. An election for a new candidate will be held to replace the previously recalled official.​
        1. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a Professional's Degree or Doctorate Degree can become a candidate in the Federal and State Elections. This period begins on the 1st of January.
          1. The candidate must nominate themselves.
        2. During a period of three weeks, any Polynesian citizen who has a high school diploma or a Certificate of High School Equivalency can cast their vote in favor of a candidate to replace the previous official.
          1. ​Only one vote may be cast by each citizen.
        3. ​The candidate who receives the most votes replaces the previous official's position.
          1. ​The newly elected candidate takes office one week after elections are finished.
            1. ​See Article 7.1.7 for the case of a tie.

Article XII Edit

Article 12 – The power of states

  1. A state is a region that is set by the federal government as its own individual part of Polynesia.
    1. There may be smaller divisions within states.
  2. A state may secede if and only if, the Branch of Legislation and the Head of Legislation of the federal and state government that wishes to secede approve of the secession by a super majority in both state and federal level.
  3. A state may be removed from the Empire if and only if, the Branch of Legislation and the Head of Legislation of the federal government approve of the removal by super majority.
  4. States have the power to create laws that apply to their state.
    1. These laws must abide the to Constitution, its amendments, and Federal Law.

Article XIII Edit

Article 13 – Wartime Powers

  1. The Congress has the power to declare war on other countries, make treaties and alliances with other countries, and declare neutrality.
    1. Congress must pass these declarations by a normal majority.
    2. When there is a war, if Congress can not pass a declaration, then they will stay neutral.
    3. If there is a conflict rises within the state, the Congress does not have to declare war.
  2. In war, the Congress will elect a single person to command the military by a normal majority.
    1. This person must be over 24, have achieved the highest standard military rank of Polynesia, and be a citizen of Polynesia.
    2. Until this person is elected, the Head of Legislation is the commander of the military.
  3. During a war, the government has the power to do what is necessary without violating any part of the Constitution or its Amendments.

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.